Green Room is a hard film to market, and in some ways a hard film to sell. Any of the marketing would have you believe that this is a horror film, and while it certainly has some scary themes, that’s not really an accurate description. It’s actually quite a difficult film to classify, but sometimes these unusual and different takes on well traversed genres turn out to be hidden gems. It also features Patrick Stewart as a neo-Nazi, which is enough to get me through the door.

After a gig goes wrong, a Punk Rock band (with no social media presence) is promised a much better opportunity by the promoter that let them down. After being told that ‘there might be some skinheads’, they’re a little surprised to find the venue they’re playing is a dedicated white supremacist clubhouse. After they accidentally witness a murder after their show, they’re forced into a fight for their lives against the neo-Nazi’s that’re holding them hostage.

Green Room Review

As you might expect from reading the synopsis, this film has a lot of setup. It feels like almost a third of the run time has gone by before we really get into the action, and because of that this film can feel a little slow at times. There’s also a bit of a lack of plot, as once the setup happens, that’s kind of it, and the rest of the film plays out more like a series of random events than a proper story.

That being said, Green Room is still an interesting film. As I said in my introduction, it’s not really like anything I’ve seen recently, and while it’s not scary it certainly is tense. The white supremacists are constantly threatening, but still manage to be realistic characters, that never devolve into cartoon villainy. This is most true of Patrick Stewart, who plays the leader of their ‘movement’, but is definitely a man who understand the way the world works. There’s also some very difficult to watch gore, that’s made even more horrible by the realism surrounding it.